AlterNative Volume 10 Issue 1

Published: 
2014

The first issue of AlterNative for 2014 celebrates the 10th anniversary of the journal. The focus for milestone Volume 10, issue 1 is on education with important and thought-provoking articles from scholars in Australia and Botswana. Other submissions come from those working in Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and Costa Rica.

A four-paper submission comprises ‘At the Heart of Learning’, a series which is coordinated by Sam Osborne, from Victoria University, Melbourne. The focus is on indigenous territories in the north-west corner of South Australia, and local (Anangu) educators join the coordinator to speak to remote educators about key ideas in education from their own perspectives. Mainstream education priorities are counter-balanced by the deeper aspects of local knowledge, values and perspectives within the context of Anangu communities and schools.

Associate Professor Lily Mafela from Botswana in “Education and perceptions of “other”: Colonial education of Batswana and formal education of Indigenous San in Botswana” considers how a marginalized people, who experience a dominating educational curriculum that continues to dominate, alienate and demean. Dr Mafela’s paper looks at how the San have formulated and implemented policies and strategies that ameliorate the educational challenges facing the San.

Cindy Gaudet, from the University of Ottawa, in “Dismantling the patriarchal alter from within”, explores the relationship with identity, memory and power and how personal and collective relationship is negotiated within patriarchal and colonial ideology - all from a Métis perspective. She considers the notion of dominant discourse, the patriarchy with, the subjugation of the body, the perpetuation of trauma and healing.

A collaboration of seven scholars from Canada and Aotearoa New Zealand has combined to author “Embodying colonization: Methodologies and indigenization.” This article explores the role of the body in decolonizing and Indigenous methodologies through the experiences and perspectives of four researchers and research teams living and working in different contexts in both countries.

This issue’s commentary (“The dynamics between indigenous rights and environmental governance: A preliminary analysis and focus on the impact of climate change governance through the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation [REDD] programme”) evaluates the complex relationship between international environmental governance and indigenous rights and the specific connects that forest dwellers and other indigenous populations have with their lands, the knowledge stemming from this bond and the major role this plays in resource protection. The author, Inès Ayari, is from the University for Peace, San José, Costa Rica.

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