AlterNative Volume 11, Issue 2

Published: 
2015

Topics in this issue of AlterNative, Volume 11, Issue 2 are diverse and cover a museological project on indigenous watercraft, two articles on indigenous health and well-being, women’s traditions, knowledge systems and environmental governance, the history of Māori land loss, community participatory action research, and the Mayan refugee identity crisis.

The lead article is by Stephen Gapps and Mariko Smith on “Nawi,” the Australian National Maritime museum’s Indigenous watercraft project, which evolved from a number of major initiatives and programmes centred on reviving, reclaiming and sharing Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander watercraft-related knowledges, skills and traditions. This article raises questions around best-practice of museological representation of indigenous cultural heritage and documents a shift in focus towards indigenous communities as producers rather than objects of knowledge.

This issue includes two articles which focus on indigenous health and well-being. Firstly, Daniel Korpal and Anne Wong examine the complexities of the relationship of education and the health of the First Nations people of Canada. They argue that education only serves as a positive social determinant of health and thereby empowers, if it reflects First Nations autonomy, cultural values and identity. Secondly, Mapuana Antonio and co-authors from Hawai‘i are the first to provide a systematic review of intervention programmes that specifically address the health and lifestyle choices of indigenous adolescents through the framework of community involvement and cultural competency.

In “It’s in our blood,” Cindy Gaudet and Diane Caron-Bourbonnais shed light on the North, Central and South American indigenous moon time teachings related to the menstrual cycle of women. The authors explore if these teachings of women’s power can be reclaimed for women’s health and well-being.

What is traditional knowledge? Nicole Latulippe pursues this question and provides a typology of traditional knowledge (TK) literature.  Her article “Situating the work,” calls for researchers to identify their own position and related assumptions, motivations and sources of knowledge, all of which shape the production of knowledge about indigenous peoples.

Tiopira McDowell in “Taua Nākahi nui: Māori, liquor and land loss in the 19th century,” argues that alcohol was used by settler traders and land agents to facilitate the alienation of Māori lands. His article looks at 19th century settler trading practices and Māori responses to these expressed in speeches and petitions to Parliament, Māori language newspapers and Mōteatea (sung poetry).

 “Who are the experts here?” is written by Juanita Sherwood and co-authors who report on the indigenous-centred methodology of the Social and Cultural Resilience and Emotional Wellbeing of Aboriginal Mothers in Prison (SCREAM) research project, a collaborative community participatory action research project aimed at helping indigenous mothers in prison transitioning back into the community.

This issue also includes a commentary on the Hispanic immigrant and refugee identity crisis as it pertains to the Mayas living in the United States, three book reviews and one film review. 

Articles in this issue: 
Start page: 
87
End page: 
102
Article type: 
Key words: 
Author(s): 
Start page: 
103
End page: 
117
Author(s): 
Start page: 
118
End page: 
132
Start page: 
132
End page: 
146
Article type: 
Start page: 
147
End page: 
163
Start page: 
164
End page: 
176
Article type: 
Start page: 
191
End page: 
198
Article type: 
Reviewed by: 
Start page: 
199
End page: 
201
Article type: 
Article type: 
Author(s): 
Reviewed by: 
Start page: 
203
End page: 
204
Article type: 
Reviewed by: 
Start page: 
205
End page: 
207