AlterNative Volume 12, Issue 2

Published: 
2016
The latest issue of AlterNative, Volume 12, Issue 2, is now available online and in print. This issue has a special focus on Indigenous peoples issues in Aotearoa New Zealand. It includes topics such as Māori maternal and infant health, traditional Māori knowledge pertaining to reproduction, a Māori philosophy of language, as well as the concept of 'relationships' in Pasifika education in Aotearoa New Zealand. This issue also features an article on talanoa, a Pasifika research method, and an article on resilience related to Native American perceptions of health and wellness. Another article, from Canada, examines the concepts of “indigeneity” and “genocide”, to better understand the hotly debated relationship between genocide and settler colonialism.
 
"Daughters of the drum: Decolonizing health and wellness with Native American women," by Danica Brown reports on a culturally centered qualitative study utilizing photovoice and talking circles to illuminate aspects of resilience related to Native American perceptions of health and wellness.

 
"Lived Realities: Birthing experiences of Māori women under 20 years of age," by Kendall Stevenson and co-authors is an expression of the needs voiced by young Māori pregnant mothers. This paper provides suggestions for practitioners, policymakers, and healthcare providers so that steps towards addressing maternal and infant health disparities between Māori and non-Māori can be made.
 
"Talanoa‘i ‘a e Talanoa — Talking about Talanoa: Some dilemmas of a novice researcher" by David Fa‘avae with Alison Jones and Linitā Manu‘atu. Fa‘avae, a Tongan PhD student, provides a critique of how talanoa, a popular Pasifika research method often likened to narrative interviews, is represented in the literature and discusses the complexities of putting talanoa into research practice.
 
"Mātauranga Māori and reproduction: Inscribing connections between the natural environment, kin and the body" by Jade Le Grice and Virginia Braun develops an account of traditional Māori knowledge (mātauranga Māori) pertaining to reproduction in a New Zealand context. The authors' findings assist in decolonizing cultural deficit knowledge about Māori to ensure health services are well equipped to understand our unique understandings as Indigenous people.

 

In an era concerned with the survival of Indigenous languages, Carl Mika, in “Worlded object and its presentation: A Māori philosophy of language,” reflects on what a speculative Māori philosophy of language might say and counters the belief that language is merely just a conveyor of ideas.

 
Jason Chalmer's article "A genocide that precedes genocide," explores the systems of meanings that underlie concepts of “indigeneity”—a category produced through colonial encounters—and “genocide”, to better understand the hotly debated relationship between genocide and settler colonialism.

 

Martyn Reynolds in "Relating to the va" provides a critical exploration of the concept of ‘relationships’ in the context of Pasifika education in Aotearoa New Zealand.  Reynolds calls for the need "to seek to practice ways in which relatedness is better configured, maintained and nurtured in both teaching and in research as we pursue Pasifika success as Pasifika."

Agnieszka Pawlowska-Mainville reviews Marisol de la Cadena's Earth beings: Ecologies of practice across Andean worlds, a book which interweaves Andean tourism, the engagement in local practices within a colonial apparatus, and the efforts of the runakuna or Quechua people to achieve land rights and justice.  Sophie Lavoie reviews Mexican film director Luciana Kaplan's 2012 full-length documentary Eufrosina's Revolution which is an account of the struggle to overcome obstacles for Indigenous women in Mexico. 
 

 

 

 

Articles in this issue: 
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109
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123
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.1
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124
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137
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.2
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.3
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.4
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.5
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.6
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.8
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10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.2.9